Here's Why You Need to Eat More Bananas
										Lose weight, reduce bloat, fight cancer and increase your energy—all for just 19 cents a piece.

Here's Why You Need to Eat More Bananas Lose weight, reduce bloat, fight cancer and increase your energy—all for just 19 cents a piece.

The humble fruit—botanically, actually a berry!—is perhaps the least-heralded supermarket staple, a superfood more associated with kids, monkeys, and slapstick comedy than with steel-cut abs. But its powers are proven, and to investigate just how bananas can be, we consulted our team of nutritionists to determine exactly what eating one banana does to your body. (Pro tip: The riper the banana, the more nutrients it has!

Here are the top, most b-a-n-a-n-a-s health benefits of bananas.

Plus, if you’re looking for some healthy recipes ideas, check out 22 Meals to Melt Belly Fat in 2022.

If after a workout, you’ve felt like your muscles are sore—or not growing fast enough—you might not be getting enough magnesium in your diet. A good source of magnesium, bananas can help with muscle contraction and relaxation as well as protein synthesis — which, in turn, increases lean muscle mass. A bonus: magnesium intake helps boost lipolysis, a process by which your body releases fat from its stores. One fun way to get your magnesium: Make banana tea. Just boil some water, cut off both ends of a banana (still in its peel) and boil for 7-10 minutes. Then drain and drink before bed.

We all know that bananas are a prime source of potassium. Because it’s an electrolyte, potassium helps your muscles recover from a workout, strengthens their development, and allows you to work out more.

Bananas don’t just look like smiles; they promote them because they contain 6% of your daily value of vitamin B9, (also known as folate), a nutrient that may fight depression by boosting a substrate that has antidepressant properties, according to the NIH. In other words, it helps serotonin, the feel-good chemical, enter the brain faster. A study in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry asserts that patients with depression have blood folate levels that are, on average, 25 percent lower than healthy folks’ levels. Some doctors recommend increasing folate intake if you’re taking anti-depressants, to boost their effects.

Besides the mood-boosting B9, bananas also have tryptophan, “a precursor for serotonin,” says Cassie Bjork, RD, LD of Healthy Simple Life, “and serotonin may be the most important brain chemical because is a natural anti-depressant and can treat, anxiety and insomnia, as well as other mood issues such as fatigue, irritability, agitation, anger, and aggression. Bananas also have norepinephrine, which regulates our “‘fight or flight response,’ which helps to regulate stress. They’re an optimal, natural, real-food way to promote positive moods and help to prevent depression,” she continues. “Good thing we don’t need a prescription!” (Try mashing on into detox water and drink your way calm.)

This is also because of the tryptophan, says Bjork. “It’s a precursor for melatonin, which promotes relaxation and helps to regulate sleep.” Peel one before bed.

According to the FDA, “the combination of a low-sodium, high potassium intake is associated with the lowest blood pressure levels and lowest frequency of stroke in individuals and populations.” Well, guess what? Bananas are high in potassium and low in sodium, the fruit is officially recognized by the FDA as being able to lower blood pressure and protect against heart attack and stroke.

Belly bloat makes even the most toned six-packer look like they just downed a six-pack of Coors. Fight back against the gas and water retention with bananas. One recent study found that women who ate a banana twice daily as a pre-meal snack for 60 days reduced their belly-bloat by 50 percent! Why? The fruit increases bloat-fighting bacteria in the stomach, and it’s also a legendarily good source of potassium, which can help diminish retention of fluids. (And if you’re looking for more helpful tips, sign up for our newsletter to get daily recipes and food news in your inbox!

Prior to ripening, bananas are rich in something called resistant starch, which, as the name suggests, literally resists the digestion process. This feeds healthy gut bacteria, which suppresses the appetite and leads to more efficient fat oxidation. In fact, one study found that replacing just 5 percent of the day’s carbohydrates with a source of resistant starch can boost post-meal fat burn by up to 30 percent! Since underripe bananas are a bit bitter, we suggest adding them into weight loss smoothies with other fruits and veggies to mask the taste.

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